Jake Norton

Jake Norton

SpeakerMatch

Challenging People. Inspiring Change.

Award-winning filmmaker, photographer, and professional climber Jake Norton will motivate your team to reach their ultimate personal and professional summits, and inspire them to look beyond the summit and find meaning in all they do.

Fee Range: Over $10,000
Travels from Evergreen, CO (US)

For more information about booking Jake Norton, visit
http://www.speakermatch.com/profile/JakeNorton

Or call SpeakerMatch at 1-866-372-8768.

Jake Norton
Jake Norton - Motivational Speaker

MountainWorld Productions

Challenging People. Inspiring Change.

Award-winning filmmaker, photographer, and professional climber Jake Norton will motivate your team to reach their ultimate personal and professional summits, and inspire them to look beyond the summit and find meaning in all they do.

Fee Range: Over $10,000
Travels from Evergreen, CO

Affiliations:
  • The National Speakers Association
Jake Norton - Motivational Speaker

Jake Norton

MountainWorld Productions

Challenging People. Inspiring Change.

Award-winning filmmaker, photographer, and professional climber Jake Norton will motivate your team to reach their ultimate personal and professional summits, and inspire them to look beyond the summit and find meaning in all they do.

Fee Range: Over $10,000
Travels from: Evergreen, CO

Affiliations:
  • The National Speakers Association

For more information about booking Jake Norton,
Visit http://www.speakermatch.com/profile/JakeNorton/
Or call SpeakerMatch at 1-866-372-8768.

Blog Postings

High in the Garhwal Himalaya, running SE-NW,…

High in the Garhwal Himalaya, running SE-NW, is one of the region’s biggest and most important glaciers: the Gangotri. @pedromcbride, @davidcmorton, and I were near the top of this 30km glacier 4 years ago, beginning to tell the story of the Ganges River. (This clip is a segment of our film, “Holy (un)Holy River.) The Ganges, which sustains 500 million people along its 1600 mile course, erupts from the toe of the glacier at Gaumukh, or Cow’s Mouth, some 25+ km below where we were. As we trudged up the glacier, dwarfed by the towering walls of Chaukhamba, supraglacial streams roared past us on all sides, the first bits of the Ganges flowing free and pure at nearly 18,000 feet. The trouble was there should not be major supraglacial flow...

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As he gazed out on Venezuela’s Lake…

As he gazed out on Venezuela's Lake Valencia in 1800, Alexander von Humboldt - who was born on this day in 1769 - being the amazing polymath he was, connected the myriad dots of lake level decrease, deforestation, and human induced micro-climate change, and was able to see the natural environment in which he was immersed as a vast, interconnected web...an idea that defied scientific conventions at the time. As he noted, "Everything is interaction and reciprocal." Humboldt was arguably the grandfather of much of modern​ science - Darwin likely would not have gone on the Beagle if not for Humboldt, and thus there would be no "Origin of Species" - and was a huge influence on the modern understanding of our world, environment, and need to pr...

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It’s hard to believe that it was…

It's hard to believe that it was 4 years ago that @pedromcbride, @davidcmorton, and I sat in Rishikesh, India, watching the spectacle of devotion that is Ganga Aarti, and preparing for a 45-day, 1600-mile journey down the most revered and reviled river in the world. Our trip following the Ganges took us from 18,000 feet in the Garhwal Himalaya - some 20 kilometers above Gaumukh on the Gangotri Glacier - through the lower hills, across the steaming and teeming Indo-Gangetic Plains to the Bay of Bengal. Three long years later, our experiences and all we learned came together in a labor of love of a film, Holy (un)Holy River. It's been screening at a lot of festivals over the past year, and has quite a few more to come in India, Czech Republic...

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Last week, I shared some images of…

Last week, I shared some images of artifacts I recovered from #Everest years ago, items from the pre-modern era expeditions that I rediscovered while moving my office. Many people in turn asked about video from that 2004 expedition...I have had one on YouTube for some years, but in poor quality, so finally found the best source footage I have (still not great) and re-uploaded the video I shot while exploring the "mystery" camp on the First Step of the Northeast Ridge back in 2004. It's an interesting camp, sitting on the ridge crest - above the standard climbing route - and, to me, the likely ascent route used by George Mallory and Andrew Irvine back in 1924. It later became a camp used by the Chinese in 1960 and again in 1975, and then by ...

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I remember first meeting @cm back in…

I remember first meeting @cm back in 1993. I was a freshman at Colorado College, and he was an illustrious alum back in town to share stories from his recent climb of K2. I was then - as now - awestruck at a person who could be so accomplished, and yet so humble. As the years passed, I got to know Charley a bit better, eventually sharing a rope with him on climbs in our backyard, and eventually on some bigger trips like our attempt on Everest's West Ridge. Throughout, Mace's humble, can-do attitude has shone through, a smile and a laugh at the ready whether we're dodging hail and lightning a couple pitches up in Clear Creek Canyon, sharing near misses in the Khumbu Icefall, or free forming it on a stunning day in New Zealand, like in this p...

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The ancient landscape of Mustang, Nepal, is…

The ancient landscape of Mustang, Nepal, is awe inspiring. Jagged canyons - carved first by glaciers and then by the mighty Kali Gandaki - etch the ruddy brown land, exposing towering bands of conglomerate and other sedimentary layers that were just slightly harder than their surroundings and survived the weathering of eons. It was in these hallmark bands of cliffs that ancient peoples, several thousand years ago, carved tombs to bury their dead, and conducted intricate, pre-Buddhist rituals to protect themselves from the undead. Who were these people who settled some 3000 years ago in one of the most inhospitable places on earth? What were their rituals and beliefs, and what of those can still be seen in Mustang today? And, what artifacts ...

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I awoke this morning thinking about our…

I awoke this morning thinking about our planet, and the deep need for us as a collective human community to love and protect it, and to foster that same love, appreciation, and protection in the generations to come. We can immerse ourselves in nature's immensity, as my daughter is here in Langtang, Nepal, or revel its minute complexity, lost in the insane intricacy of creation. But, if we don't experience it, we don't understand it and what we don't understand we don't value and protect. The key is getting ourselves and our kids into our natural world. The hero of @stownpodcast, John McLemore, expressed it so well: "I’ve coaxed many infirm clocks back to mellifluous life, studied projected geometry and built astrolabes, sundials, taught m...

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Over the years, I’ve had the opportunity…

Over the years, I've had the opportunity to climb and work with some amazing people, around the world. One of those special souls is @brb13770. Brent's climbing career speaks for itself, with multiple Everest summits of ascents of classic routes around the world. But, what makes him unique is Brent is far more than a climber. Throughout his career, Brent has focused on making a difference by co-founding the Sagarmatha Environmental Expedition in 1994 and dedicating his time and energy to important causes around the world, earning him the Lowell Thomas Award from @the_explorers_club and the David R. Brower Award from @americanalpine. Brent also makes the hard-but-right choices on his climbs, like just this May giving up another summit of Eve...

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I first took environmental science in high…

I first took environmental science in high school, and learned about the stunning complexity of our natural world and its oxymoronic power and frailty. At the same time in another building, we read the iconic “Walden” by Henry David Thoreau in English class. Thoreau, one of the first prominent environmentalists, would be 200 years old today, and his words from yesteryear ring even truer today than before. In “Walking,” written for the Atlantic in 1862, Thoreau famously proclaimed: “In Wildness is the preservation of the World.” An incredible truism both in 1862 and perhaps more so today, yet, day by day, we see our limited wildness depleted, the “civilization other than our own” (Journal, 1859) ravaged by industry, pillaged ...

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Fun cragging on perfect limestone with the…

Fun cragging on perfect limestone with the kids, s'mores at night under starry skies, cool nights and warm days, lots of laughs, a few tears, great memories, and more than one magical sunset across the rolling hills and out to the snowy, distant Wind Rivers...Wild Iris did not disappoint. #liveyouradventure #wildiris #wyoming #pixel #shotbypixel...

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