James D. Feldman CSP

James D. Feldman CSP

Shift Happens!®

A practitioner with insight, wisdom & big picture thinking.

Jim collaborates with organizations to evaluate problems, create a vision where others aren't looking, capture what others are not seeing, on the Journey To Bright Ideas.

Fee Range: Available Upon Request
Travels from Chicago, IL

For more information about booking James D. Feldman CSP, visit
http://www.speakermatch.com/profile/jamesfeldman

Or call SpeakerMatch at 1-866-372-8768.

James D. Feldman CSP
Mr. James Feldman CSP, , CITE, CPT, CPIM, MIP, PCS - Motivational Speaker

Shift Happens!®

A practitioner with insight, wisdom & big picture thinking.

Jim collaborates with organizations to evaluate problems, create a vision where others aren't looking, capture what others are not seeing, on the Journey To Bright Ideas.

Fee Range: Available Upon Request
Travels from Chicago, IL

Affiliations:
  • The National Speakers Association
  • Certified Speaking Professional
James D. Feldman CSP - Motivational Speaker

James D. Feldman CSP

Shift Happens!®

A practitioner with insight, wisdom & big picture thinking.

Jim collaborates with organizations to evaluate problems, create a vision where others aren't looking, capture what others are not seeing, on the Journey To Bright Ideas.

Fee Range: Available Upon Request
Travels from: Chicago, IL

Affiliations:
  • The National Speakers Association
  • Certified Speaking Professional

For more information about booking James D. Feldman CSP,
Visit http://www.speakermatch.com/profile/jamesfeldman/
Or call SpeakerMatch at 1-866-372-8768.

3D Strategic Planning
Strategic thinking is above the neck. Tactical is below the neck.

It’s estimated worldwide that more than 60% of strategies are not successfully implemented. The best time to create a strategic plan is nowSet a timetable. For anyone who’s tried to execute strategy, this finding should come as no surprise. When asked to define strategy execution, most managers respond with statements like, “It’s the successful implementation of a strategic plan” or “It’s getting your strategy done.” While these perspectives are certainly valid, they aren’t very helpful in terms of understanding what needs to be done to actually drive business results. Attendees will leave with the basic tools to develop and execute a strategic plan. Simply put, strategic planning determines where an organization is going over the next year or more, how it's going to get there and how it'll know if it got there or not. The focus of a strategic plan is usually on the entire organization, while the focus of a business plan is usually on a particular product, service or program. In this presentation we will discuss different strategic planning directions. 1) Goals-based strategic planning is probably the most common and starts with focus on the organization's mission (and vision and/or values), goals to work toward the mission, strategies to achieve the goals, and action planning (who will do what and by when). 2) Issues-based strategic planning often starts by examining issues facing the organization, strategies to address those issues and action plans. 3) Organic strategic planning might start by articulating the organization's vision and values, and then action plans to achieve the vision while adhering to those values. Some planners prefer a particular approach to planning, e.g., appreciative inquiry. Some plans are scoped to one year, many to three years, and some to five to ten years into the future. Some plans include only top- level information and no action plans. Some plans are five to eight pages long, while others can be considerably longer. In our presentation I provided the highpoint of each of these three approaches. At the conclusion attendees can 1. Clearly define the purpose of the organization and to establish realistic goals and objectives consistent with that mission in a defined time frame within the organization’s capacity for implementation. 2. Communicate those goals and objectives to the organization’s constituents. 3. Develop a sense of ownership of the plan. 4. Ensure the most effective use is made of the organization’s resources by focusing the resources on the key priorities. 5. Provide a base from which progress can be measured and establish a mechanism for informed change when needed. 6. Listen to everyone’s opinions in order to build consensus about where the organization is going.