Jake Norton

Jake Norton

SpeakerMatch

Challenging People. Inspiring Change.

Award-winning filmmaker, photographer, and professional climber Jake Norton will motivate your team to reach their ultimate personal and professional summits, and inspire them to look beyond the summit and find meaning in all they do.

Fee Range: $7,500 - $10,000
Travels from Evergreen, CO (US)

For more information about booking Jake Norton, visit
http://www.speakermatch.com/profile/JakeNorton

Or call SpeakerMatch at 1-866-372-8768.

Jake Norton
Jake Norton - Motivational Speaker

MountainWorld Productions

Challenging People. Inspiring Change.

Award-winning filmmaker, photographer, and professional climber Jake Norton will motivate your team to reach their ultimate personal and professional summits, and inspire them to look beyond the summit and find meaning in all they do.

Fee Range: $7,500 - $10,000
Travels from Evergreen, CO

Affiliations:
  • The National Speakers Association
Jake Norton - Motivational Speaker

Jake Norton

MountainWorld Productions

Challenging People. Inspiring Change.

Award-winning filmmaker, photographer, and professional climber Jake Norton will motivate your team to reach their ultimate personal and professional summits, and inspire them to look beyond the summit and find meaning in all they do.

Fee Range: $7,500 - $10,000
Travels from: Evergreen, CO

Affiliations:
  • The National Speakers Association

For more information about booking Jake Norton,
Visit http://www.speakermatch.com/profile/JakeNorton/
Or call SpeakerMatch at 1-866-372-8768.

Blog Postings

There are so many great organizations to…

There are so many great organizations to support not only on #GivingTuesday, but everyday. My friends at @dzifoundation, @herfarmnepal and @thejuniperfund are changing lives in Nepal everyday. As mentioned, @big_city_mountaineers is transforming kids through the experience of wilderness, while @sgalpin74 does a similar thing with Afghan girls at @mtn2mtn. But, I wanted to mention a story I shared back in July of Buliyo Euta, the snow leopard we tried to save in Upper Mustang. He sadly did not make it, despite the hard work and courage of many. But, his memory need not be lost; Buliyo Euta can live on through your donation today to help preserve and protect snow leopards, their habitat, and the people who live amongst them. Please consider a...

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The mountains have been my wellspring of…

The mountains have been my wellspring of passion and energy since I was 12 years old and made my first real climbs, on Washington's Mt. Rainier and - as seen here - on peaks in the French Alps. Those early experiences of success and struggle, joy and pain, informed my life in ways I could never have predicted. On a pragmatic level, my passion for climbing and the outdoors has enabled me to build a career in climbing, and to do what I love to do (and sometimes get paid for it). But, on a more profound level, the outdoors have given me perspective on life and the world I know I wouldn't have gotten otherwise. The mountains have taught me about my abilities and my inabilities, about the joy of struggling for that which seems unattainable, abou...

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Sending big happy birthday wishes to @conrad_anker…

Sending big happy birthday wishes to @conrad_anker today. I've had the honor and pleasure to be on #Everest with Conrad 3 times (1999 on our first expedition, 2003 for the wacky Global Extremes reality TV series, and 2012 when we were both trying to climb the West Ridge), I've gazed up - with wonder and a bit of terror - at the route he pioneered up the Shark's Fin on Meru with @jimmy_chin and @renan_ozturk, and watched with deep admiration as he's leveraged his clout and notoriety to make our world a better place through @khumbuclimbingcenter and more. He's an astonishing, visionary alpinist, a dedicated steward of our world, and a great guy. Happy Birthday, Conrad, and here's to many more trips around the sun! | In this photo, Conrad...

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They came from all over. The room…

They came from all over. The room was teeming with people, sharing a meal together even though they had just met, smiling and laughing and sharing the bounty of humanity that unites us all (whether we choose to embrace it or not). Wende and I sat at a table with a newly arrived refugee from Ethiopia and his 6 year old daughter. He fled persecution in his homeland 14 years ago, and lived in the destitute UNHCR camp of Dadaab until coming to America; the tent city in northern Kenya was the only home his daughter knew until 1 month ago. Joining us at the table was another woman, another refugee, hailing from Eritrea, a long time enemy of Ethiopia, each nation jointly responsible for the suffering of each other’s people. But, here these two m...

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My great uncle, Roe Duke Watson, served…

My great uncle, Roe Duke Watson, served on the front lines in World War II. He was gravely wounded in 1945 after shrapnel from a 170mm German howitzer shell shredded his abdomen on Mount della Torraccia while serving in the 87th Mountain Regiment (10th Mountain Division). He was a great man, a hero of mine in myriad ways. On this Veteran's Day, I salute all the men and women who have served and do serve our country and our world, and I honor deeply the sacrifices they make to uphold the values and rights of us all, inside the USA and outside. Uncle Duke was one of many who put it all on the line to protect the lives of those who needed help, to defeat fascism and racism and hatred and uphold fundamental human rights and freedoms. To all th...

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What do we do now? WTF? This…

What do we do now? WTF? This thought, and many more, have been ringing in my ears for the last couple days. I couldn’t think straight today, not because of Hillary losing, but because of him winning. Fear and anger have clouded my brain, racing thoughts of all the good that could be undone in 4 short years. I’m sure I’m not alone. But, optimism has slowly crept back in… optimism tempered with empathy, compassion, and resolve. First off, empathy and compassion for those who have suffered so much in recent decades they’ve thrown their hat in Trump who’s spoon-fed them lies and preyed upon underlying resentments and fear. Empathy because while some are indeed seething racists and misanthropes I struggle to feel much of anything...

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On my first trip to the Southeast…

On my first trip to the Southeast Ridge of Everest, I made a few hour foray from Basecamp o a rest day to check out this cool, rock spire far down the Khumbu Glacier. I didn't have gear with me to climb it, so made do with bouldering at the base and enjoying the solitude, figuring erroneously it had never been visited, or climbed. It wasn't until I got to know the amazing Tom Hornbein years later that I found out it had been climbed, by Hornbein and Barry Corbet on a similar foray some 39 years before. While insignificant as a climb, their small, fun ascent represents the ethic of the 1963 "West Ridgers" on Everest which I so admire: they were there not simply to get a summit, but rather for the adventure of the climb, a step into the unkno...

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The rugged upper reaches of the Gangotri…

The rugged upper reaches of the Gangotri Glacier - where the first waters of the Ganges River (at this point, known as the Bhagirathi) come thundering from the snout of the glacier at a place called Gaumukh, or cow's mouth - seems like a pristine wonderland. And, in many ways it is: the glacier yields to sweeping walls of granite forming massifs like Shivling, the Bhagirathis, and the Chaukhambas. The surface trickles of water are clean and crisp - so clean that we were able to drink no problem without any purification. But, look deeper, and the woes of the Ganges downstream are evident even here. In the snows at the base of Chaukhamba, our samples showed high levels of heavy metals and nitrates: pollutants borne on the winds and deposited ...

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The humble Jerry Can. It’s not something…

The humble Jerry Can. It's not something we think much of in the developed world. Perhaps we use one on car camping trips when water is not readily available; I've got a couple for just that purpose. Originally designed in the 1930's for the German military (hence, "Jerry") to haul gasoline, the typical Jerry Can holds 20 liters, or 5.3 US gallons, of liquid. In the developing world, the Jerry Can is both a symbol of hope and despair. Despair in that hundreds of millions of people - mostly women and children - spend hours each day hauling these jugs long distances to and from safe water points. A full Can weighs 44 pounds. For 800 million people globally, safe, accessible water is simply not a reality; this fundamental human right - which w...

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No, it’s not Utah, but it looks…

No, it's not Utah, but it looks a lot like it. A kingdom since 1380 (semi-autonomous from 1768 to 2008 under Nepali suzerainty, now no longer officially a kingdom), Upper Mustang, the Kingdom of Lo, is an other-worldly place in all ways. Here one sees firsthand the collision of centuries, as ancient lifestyles of subsistence agriculture and animal husbandry intermingle with roads and tourism, Facebook and television. The land of Mustang is physically changing as development creeps in, and the culture and heritage is as well. With human settlement dating back at least 3,000 years or more, there is ton to learn about and from in this remarkable region, but the clock is ticking. Just two years ago, not far from where this photo was taken, uran...

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